Georgia Stones Blown Up

Georgia Stones Blown Up: On Wednesday, a predawn bombing reduced one of the four granite panels at a rural Georgia monument known as “America’s Stonehenge” into rubble, which led to the monument’s demolition. Some fundamentalist Christians denounced the monument as being demonic, while others named it “America’s Stonehenge.”

According to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, an explosive device caused damage to the Georgia Guidestones monument that was located in Elberton. The monument was then demolished “for safety concerns,” leaving a mound of wreckage in an image that the investigators provided.

Monuments erected by social justice groups offer an alternative story to those told by Confederate memorials. Just after 4 in the morning, surveillance footage captured a powerful explosion that reduced one panel to shattered fragments. A video showing a silver automobile driving away from the monument was also shared by the investigators.

Chris Kubas, executive vice president of the Elbert Granite Association, claimed that after previous acts of vandalism, video cameras that were connected to the emergency dispatch center of the county were installed at the site.

Investigators from several different law enforcement agencies have gathered at the scene approximately 161 kilometers (100 miles) east of Atlanta in an effort to piece together what caused the explosion that shattered a portion of the monument that was 42 years old and was known as the Georgia Guidestones.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) later published on its official Twitter account a video clip of the explosion captured on a security camera as well as other footage of a car driving away from the location of the incident.

It stated that “for safety considerations” the remaining portion of the edifice was deliberately dismantled later in the day, and it included a photo that showed the whole monument reduced to rubble. It was determined that “unknown persons” were responsible for the first damage because they “detonated an explosive device” at the location.

The 19-foot-tall monument used to be comprised of one upright slab in the center of four bigger tablets set around it, with a massive rectangular capstone put over the others. Before it was damaged, the monument was in its original state.

Georgia Guidestones possible explosion

The collection of grey monoliths was constructed in 1980 in the center of a wide field close to the town of Elberton, Georgia, along Highway 77. It was later classified as a tourist destination by the travel site for the state of Georgia as well as the Elbert County Chamber of Commerce.

According to official translations of the text, the slabs were etched with a mysterious message that called for the preservation of humans by reducing the population of the globe to less than half a billion people so that they might live “in permanent balance with nature.”

Under the guise of R.C. Christian, an unidentified person or organization commissioned the construction of the mysterious roadside attraction in 1980 using the granite that was found in the area.

Katie McCarthy, who does research on conspiracy theories for the Anti-Defamation League, said that “that’s given the Guidestones a sort of shroud of mystery around them,” because of the identity and intent of the individuals who commissioned them are unknown. “That’s given the Guidestones a sort of shroud of mystery around them,” “As a result of this, throughout the course of the years, a lot of speculation and conspiracy theories regarding the Guidestone’s actual purpose have been fueled.”

The panels, which stood at a height of 16 feet (5 meters), each included a 10-part statement that was written in eight different languages and offered advice on how to live in an “era of reason.” One section of the report recommended that the global population be maintained at or below 500 million, while another section recommended “guiding reproduction intelligently — boosting fitness and variety.”

In addition, it functioned as an astronomical calendar and a sundial. However, it was the panels’ discussion of eugenics, population control, and global governance that caused extreme right-wing conspiracy theorists to focus their attention on them.

Georgia Guidestones demolished after bombing

According to Kubas, the popularity of the monument skyrocketed after the advent of the internet, and it eventually became a roadside tourist attraction that receives thousands of visitors each year.

When Republican candidate Kandiss Taylor, who finished in third place in Georgia’s gubernatorial primary on May 24, made the assertion that the Guidestones are satanic and made destroying them part of her platform, the site garnered fresh attention for the first time in a while. In a sketch that aired at the end of May, comedian John Oliver highlighted the Guidestones as well as Taylor. McCarthy stated that right-wing figures such as Alex Jones had discussed them in prior years, but that “they sort of got back onto the public’s radar” because of Taylor. Taylor’s death brought them “back onto the public’s radar,” McCarthy added.

When Republican candidate Kandiss Taylor, who finished in third place in Georgia’s gubernatorial primary on May 24, made the assertion that the Guidestones are satanic and made destroying them part of her platform, the site garnered fresh attention for the first time in a while. In a sketch that aired at the end of May, comedian John Oliver highlighted the Guidestones as well as Taylor. McCarthy stated that right-wing figures such as Alex Jones had discussed them in prior years, but that “they sort of got back onto the public’s radar” because of Taylor. Taylor’s death brought them “back onto the public’s radar,” McCarthy added.

“God is whole and perfect in and of Himself. He is able to accomplish ANY goal he sets for himself “Wednesday, Taylor posted a message on several social media platforms. “This includes destroying Satanic Guidestones,” the speaker said.

McCarthy stated that the monument has a history of being defaced, as seen by the instances in 2008 and 2014 when it was spray-painted. According to her, the blast is another illustration of how conspiracy theories “can and may have a real-world impact.”

McCarthy stated that “we’ve seen this with QAnon and numerous other conspiracy theories,” which means that “these concepts can inspire somebody to try to take action in favor of these views.” “We’ve seen this with QAnon and several other conspiracy theories.” “They can make an effort to try to target the individuals and organizations that are at the core of these erroneous views,” we could say.

Kubas and a great number of other individuals view the stones as providing some kind of instruction on how to reconstruct civilization after an apocalyptic event.

“It’s up to your own perspective as to how you want to perceive things,” Kubas added. “It’s up to your own personal interpretation.” The explosion was recorded on security video that was made public by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation. In one of the videos, it is possible to see a vehicle driving away from the area.

The granite slabs carried a statement in ten parts and twelve different languages advocating for the preservation of humanity and the generations to come.

The mystery that surrounds the stones has prompted some people to hypothesize that they are a call to lower the human population. This theory is motivated by a warning to keep the population of the world to less than 500 million people.

Georgia Stones Blown Up

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